Survey: State School Teachers Say Much of Their Work Is Meaningless

My recent survey of more than 800 teachers from across England investigates what schools can do to improve teachers’ job satisfaction. The survey report compares working conditions in England’s state and independent schools. I wanted to identify what contributes to teachers’ job satisfaction, and what each sector can learn from the other in order to improve working conditions and address the national teacher retention crisis.

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Painting Your “Unconscious” Voice : A Look Through a Researcher’s Art Book

I am not a painter. I am not a photographer either. However, the PhD research experience was so intense for me that I had to find a way of getting out all the thoughts, feelings and stress of writing a PhD on Higher Education (HE) in the Gaza Strip. Painting was one of the things I enjoyed when I was very little. For years it disappeared from my life as my voice became silenced, witnessing and listening to narratives of oppression on a daily basis, of which I was a part. In this art book, I share some of the sketches I produced through the process of researching HE under occupation in Gaza.

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Musings of a First Year MEd Student

One of our induction talks was to assure us all. We are not imposters but rather individuals who have earned their place.  As I sat listening, I smiled (she read my mind).  Although I knew fully well that I had earned my place,  I felt like an imposter.  I looked around the room and noticed there were only 4 other black students. This led to writing this poem.

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Degrees of Collaboration

One might argue that many of the world’s current political issues stem from a pointedly competitive worldview – a sense of ‘us’ versus ‘them’ that assumes limited resources and thus the need to protect or reserve said resources according to a hierarchy. In the last two years, we have been playing to a different professional tune.

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What Ensures Good Quality Research Data?

Not many people get an opportunity to be a part of an organization even after leaving it. I’ve been one of those lucky ones, remaining connected to the ASER Centre, the research and assessment arm of Pratham Education Foundation in India, for whom I have worked for more than 3 years. When I got the opportunity to pursue a PhD at the University of Cambridge, I was delighted to learn that the REAL Centre at the Faculty of Education would be working closely with the ASER Centre on a grassroots intervention to increase accountability in education in rural India.

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