Like Son, Like Mother: A Family’s Journey through the M.Ed

Teacher and education consultant Kay Blayney was inspired by her oldest son Matthew to follow in his footsteps and study for a part-time Master’s degree at the Faculty of Education – where her second son, Philip, then joined her as a full-time Master’s student. As they prepare to graduate together, Kay and Philip reflect on the benefits of their mother-and-son educational journey together.

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A Blog Post about Blogging Featuring The Thesis Whisperer

Thinking about starting a research blog? Dr Inger Mewburn is the Director of Research Training at the Australian National Universityand the founder of the popular academic blog The Thesis Whisperer. The Thesis Whisperer has been running successfully for several years and contains many helpful articles about the process of doing a PhD. The FERSA blog editors were therefore delighted when Dr Mewburn agreed to a short interview, where she shared some of her insight into how to run a successful blog.

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Adulting in Cambridge as an International Student from Undergraduate to Postgraduate: My 4-year and to-be-continued Cambridge Life

In this blog post, Vicky weaves a heartwarming narrative of her journey into the field of education as an international student in Cambridge. She is one of those rare few who has experienced three matriculations at the University of Cambridge. She started as an undergraduate student, went on to do an MPhil and is currently pursuing a PhD at the Faculty of Education.

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Multimodality, Transcription and Educational Research: Learning Beyond Verbal Language

In my doctoral research, I studied 4-year-olds’ meaning-making processes when reading digital literature with their parents where observation was the central method of data collection. So what could I learn about meaning-making (and learning in general) by looking at these reading events? The answer, I found, can be significantly different depending on the methods employed for recording and analyzing these observations.

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Succeeding at Writing a Theoretical PhD Thesis

My dissertation contains no interview or survey data, even though I was a journalist and should be good at interviewing. This option – a theoretical study – appeared to be a relatively rare one among my PhD colleagues. It certainly has its own perks: you don’t need to worry about travel plans and other fieldwork problems, and your friends will probably be jealous of you, because to them you are just sitting in a library all day.

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The Challenges of Research Access and Accessible Research

My experiences with the US education system and my positioning in American society as a biracial woman of color, who is often identified as Black, have shaped and influenced my research interests and how I approach my work. As a researcher, I am interested in the concept of intelligence; it is a quality often viewed as necessary for success in virtually all facets of life — social, economic, political, and educational. Rooted in a history deeply tied to eugenic, classist, and racialized discourses, intelligence and its study have long offered scientific ways of making sense of human diversity and of classifying individuals in terms of ‘ability.’

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