School Funding Cuts: Stories from the Chalk-Face

When I started my PhD research into teachers’ working conditions, I knew that budgets for England’s schools were shrinking. I had observed this through my own experiences as a classroom teacher. By 2016, the year I left the profession, the heady days of pens and paper for all were over. I accepted that pupils shared core texts, I bought my own board pens, lined paper was a pipe-dream, student counselling hours were sparse, and many other professional services were out of budget. What I did not know was the reach of the problem, nor had I anticipated that it would escalate into a national funding crisis.

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Like Son, Like Mother: A Family’s Journey through the M.Ed

Teacher and education consultant Kay Blayney was inspired by her oldest son Matthew to follow in his footsteps and study for a part-time Master’s degree at the Faculty of Education – where her second son, Philip, then joined her as a full-time Master’s student. As they prepare to graduate together, Kay and Philip reflect on the benefits of their mother-and-son educational journey together.

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A Blog Post about Blogging Featuring The Thesis Whisperer

Thinking about starting a research blog? Dr Inger Mewburn is the Director of Research Training at the Australian National Universityand the founder of the popular academic blog The Thesis Whisperer. The Thesis Whisperer has been running successfully for several years and contains many helpful articles about the process of doing a PhD. The FERSA blog editors were therefore delighted when Dr Mewburn agreed to a short interview, where she shared some of her insight into how to run a successful blog.

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Adulting in Cambridge as an International Student from Undergraduate to Postgraduate: My 4-year and to-be-continued Cambridge Life

In this blog post, Vicky weaves a heartwarming narrative of her journey into the field of education as an international student in Cambridge. She is one of those rare few who has experienced three matriculations at the University of Cambridge. She started as an undergraduate student, went on to do an MPhil and is currently pursuing a PhD at the Faculty of Education.

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Multimodality, Transcription and Educational Research: Learning Beyond Verbal Language

In my doctoral research, I studied 4-year-olds’ meaning-making processes when reading digital literature with their parents where observation was the central method of data collection. So what could I learn about meaning-making (and learning in general) by looking at these reading events? The answer, I found, can be significantly different depending on the methods employed for recording and analyzing these observations.

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