Corpus Linguistics: More than Meets the Eye

As a PhD student, one of the first questions I get asked is “what is your research on?”. When I respond with “corpus linguistics,” many people either raise their eyebrows or proceed to ask me what that is. The brief explanation of this is: A corpus is a collection of written or spoken texts that offer systematic insight into how a language is used in the population that the corpus represents. However, it goes without saying that corpus linguistics encompasses much more than scrutinizing the use of certain words and/or expressions. It is a powerful tool that can offer new insight into both language teaching and learning. It is also a tool that has made a tremendous impact not only in the field of linguistics, but also in various areas of education and material development.

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Inclusive Approaches to Researching Disability in Children’s Literature

The catalyst for this doctoral project was the realisation that there was very little research within the growing field of disability in children’s literature that asked for children’s views of such texts and only one project so far had begun to consider the views of disabled children. To me, this seemed to be a fundamental gap in the research: I firmly believe that disabled children should be asked for their views on the representation of their own lived experience, on which they are the experts, in line with Article 12 of the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989).

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Embracing Open Science

Openness is becoming an integral part of the research process as more and more researchers are adopting its principles and practices. Our research group, INSTRUCT, led by Dr Michelle Ellefson, has been increasingly interested in the idea of Open Science this year. Nearly all of our group members are attending lectures and training sessions across the university with the aim to understand Open Science and create strategies to practice its principles in current and future research projects. In this blog, we will share an overview of what we have learned so far, and encourage those who are interested in learning more about openness in research.

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Multimodality, Transcription and Educational Research: Learning Beyond Verbal Language

In my doctoral research, I studied 4-year-olds’ meaning-making processes when reading digital literature with their parents where observation was the central method of data collection. So what could I learn about meaning-making (and learning in general) by looking at these reading events? The answer, I found, can be significantly different depending on the methods employed for recording and analyzing these observations.

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The Challenges of Research Access and Accessible Research

My experiences with the US education system and my positioning in American society as a biracial woman of color, who is often identified as Black, have shaped and influenced my research interests and how I approach my work. As a researcher, I am interested in the concept of intelligence; it is a quality often viewed as necessary for success in virtually all facets of life — social, economic, political, and educational. Rooted in a history deeply tied to eugenic, classist, and racialized discourses, intelligence and its study have long offered scientific ways of making sense of human diversity and of classifying individuals in terms of ‘ability.’

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Research Poems – What Are They Up To?

Researchers in education tell me about their poems. I only have to mention that my research is in poetry education and before you know it I’m being asked about publication and performance, and what I think of rap. I go to conferences and there’s an education researcher freestyling about their topic. I open an education thesis in the library and there’s a poem half way through its reflexive workout. Surrounded by research poems, unsure what to make of them, I figured I’d better investigate. So, what exactly are research poems?

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